Learn Your Favorite Video Game Fighting Moves From This Martial Artist’s YouTube Channel

How many times have you laid a serious, virtual beatdown on some poor sucker that thought they could step to you and thought, “If only I could do that IRL…” Well now you can learn how to recreate your favorite video game fighting moves thanks to a martial artist and gamer’s YouTube channel.

Martial Gamer is a YouTuber who reenacts and analyzes martial arts moves from popular video games. Inspired by his love of games and movies and his own martial arts practice, Martial Gamer investigates the history and techniques you’ve seen in your favorite games “without being diluted by my own personal opinions of [their] practicality.” His videos are brief, comprehensive, and fascinating to watch, whatever your interest in martial arts.

If you have ever wanted to learn how to do perform Metal Gear Solid 3’s “close quarters combat” developed by Snake and The Boss, Martial Gamer can teach you:

Or if you’ve ever wanted to learn how to break arms like in Yakuza 4, Martial Gamer has you covered:

Here’s Street Fighter IV’s Abel, put in the context of the move in various grappling arts:

Remember when Shepard and James fought in Mass Effect 3? Well, here’s how Shepard’s throw is explained through its place as a fundamental judo move.

Now, I cannot stress enough that you should not try to employ these fighting moves from your favorite video games. Fighting, in general, is not cool. However, there’s nothing wrong with exploring the history of the moves to peak our own curiosity in martial arts.

 

Martial Gamer says he hopes these videos inspire others to get into martial arts. These videos, alongside footage from jitsu meetups, probably won’t get us on the mat any time soon, but they’re pretty damn cool.

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